Longshore Harbor Worker Injuries

Maritime Law Extends to Shore – Crew Member Injuries, Cruise Ship Workers, Longshoremen, Harbor Workers, Stevedores and Ship Builders are Eligible for Extra Protection When Injured and South Florida Admiralty Attorney Robert Gross Can Help with Effective and Experienced Representation in handling Hundreds of Maritime Injury Legal Matters

Robert C. Gross, P.A. - Cruise Ship Worker Injuries - Miami Maritime Attorney

It's a fact that working at sea – crew member injuries aboard a cruise ship, tanker, barge, yacht, fishing ship or other vessel can be among the most dangerous work an individual can do. What can be overlooked, however, is the work related to this industry that's conducted shoreside. From building and construction of ports, marinas and other dockage areas to the loading and unloading to commercial vessels, longshoremen, harbor workers, stevedores and ship builders  have jobs that are exceptionally demanding physically and workplaces that are wrought with inherent dangers – such as the use of heavy equipment, wet or slippery surfaces, language barriers with the vessel's crew or operators.  The list of dangers can go on and on, but if you're injured doing this type of work, legal provisions exist to protect you until you're back on your feet.

Federal legislation – the Longshore Harbor Workers Compensation Act – applies to workers who are hurt in the line of duty while on navigable waters or nearby areas. Excluded from this legislation are individuals protected by the Jones Act 46 U.S.C.§ 30104, a protection for seamen who work aboard ships.

The Longshore Harbor Workers Compensation Act is designed to insure that injured workers are compensated for:

  • Lost wages
  • Medical treatment
  • Rehabilitation services
  • Illnesses related to or caused by the occupation

Even if your employer was not negligent or at fault for your injury or illness, it is responsible for providing for you should you be injured on the job. If there is negligence at play – either your employer's or that of another party (for example, the ship you've been hired to unload) – the act allows additional damages to be collected that can far exceed compensation for lost wages. The catch? All claims filed under the Longshore Harbor Workers Compensation Act must be made within one year of your crew member injuries, or within one year of the last compensation for injury.

Negotiating compensation with employers or third parties can be a complex proposition, and litigating such situations requires an experienced attorney with experience and excellent knowledge of maritime law and admiralty regulations, as well as applicable state and local guidelines. Miami attorney Robert Gross has been recognized by Martindale Hubbell with a 4.8 out of 5 rating in maritime and admiralty law in its AV rating system. The organization recognizes Gross as a "preeminent lawyer," as do the hundreds of clients for whom he has successfully represented.

If you've been injured in a maritime accident while working as a longshoreman, harbor worker, stevedore or ship builder, make sure you're receiving all the benefits provided by federal legislation. Call 305-670-9009 to schedule a free and confidential consultation with Miami attorney Robert Gross. All cases are handled on a contingency basis – meaning you pay no lawyer's fees or court costs unless monetary damages are recovered for you.

Attorney Robert C. Gross is a Miami, Florida maritime, admiralty attorney experienced in cruise ship claims, cruise slip and fall, cruise trip and fall claims, passenger injury claims, seaman injury claims. Our recent cases include cruise ship claims against Norwegian Cruise Lines, Carnival Cruise Lines, Celebrity, Princess Cruises, Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines and are based on passenger injury and cruise accidents. Call Robert C. Gross at 305-670-9009 if you need a cruise ship passenger injury lawyer.